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Scaffolding Inspection

Scaffolding is a temporary multipurpose platform used to facilitate workers. It can elevate workers for construction, repair, or cleaning purposes. Its size could vary according to site requirements. The whole project or building is surrounded by scaffolding at some sites. Risk is always involved in such platforms as they are temporary platforms that could be removed or loose by accident. Elevation also involves risk factors at a certain height. Following professional guidelines to install and ensure safety by inspecting scaffolding is mandatory.

Employers and independent contractors are required by law to evaluate the risk of working at heights and then organize and plan the work so that it may be done safely.

Fall prevention measures must be implemented. General access scaffolds should be available when possible as they offer a way to work at a height while preventing falls.

Things to think about include the following:

  • General access scaffold requirements

  • Guard rails, toe boards, and other barriers

  • Scaffold design

  • Scaffold structures that generally require a bespoke design

  • Competence and supervision of scaffolding operative

  • Scaffold inspection


Why Should Scaffolding Be Inspected?


Since 1971, the OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) Standards Committee has created a clear standard for the use of scaffolds. The most common risk involved in working on scaffolding is falling due to slipping. Therefore, OSHA demands scaffolds be inspected after installation, at least every week, and in harsh weather conditions.

These guidelines and measures could reduce the risk factors and save precious life and monetary losses.


How to Inspect Scaffolding:

A professional and well-trained person must inspect scaffolding. He could become an HSE officer who has the authority to validate the integrity of scaffolding in each inspection.


Building the Scaffold:

Scaffold design must come from a licensed engineer and within the checklist provided by OSHA. Grading of material is essential. Unssacry materials must be removed as they may encourage weak structures, leading to structural failure due to living and dead loads.


Hazards Around the Scaffold:

During the inspection, it must be ensured that electric power lines must be de-energized else they could generate earthing phenomena in the entire structure of scaffolding. Furthermore, it is essential to attach a ladder with scaffolding in the light of principles provided by OSHA, or else it could threaten the integrity of the entire structure.Most Common Hazards Associated With Using Scaffolds are as follows:

  • Falling from height.

  • Another serious hazard associated with scaffolding is the risk of collapse.

  • Another hazard associated with scaffolding is the risk of electrocution if the structure comes into contact with power lines.

  • Another hazard associated with scaffolding is the risk of falling objects.


Structural Concerns:

Scaffold design must come from a licensed engineer and within the checklist provided by OSHA. Grading of material is essential. Unssacry materials must be removed as they may encourage weak structures which could lead to structural failure due to living and dead loads.

Furthermore, the wooden plank must be joined properly to bear the load and avoid structural failure.


Tagging:

After each scaffold inspection, scaffolds need to be labeled with a safety rating.

  • The green tag indicates that the structure is entirely stable and safe.

  • The yellow indicates scaffolds may pose a threat but should be safe for work.

  • Red-tagged scaffolds should be immediately eliminated because they are no longer suitable for use, highlighting the significance of red tags.

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